Charities Should Not Follow The Rules, But Overthrow Them

While the popular belief is that action speaks louder than words, however, in the modern day and age, actions do not speak louder than words. Sadly, making the world a better place is not enough for a charity in order to make people give more. This is especially true in a world where the cult of brand purpose is to direct that every brand, whether it is charitable or commercial – must have its vision around a statement that talks about how it is looking to build a brighter future for everyone.

In a situation like this, how can a charity construct a brand that is able to compete for the attention of consumer when it goes up against brands like Unilever?

One could almost suggest that charities should start acting like commercial brands. However, if you are someone who manages a charity brand, it is better if you avoid becoming the Samsung of not-for-profit world. There is a stark difference between charity brands and corporate brands; where a corporate brand is in the market for competition, market share, and profit, a charity brand’s main purpose is to ensure a cooperation, and to build relationships between the person who is donating, and the one who is receiving the donations. It should not imitate how a corporate brand is managed, but instead, overthrow those principles.

Let Your Brand Be Used

Unlike corporate brands, charity brands do not need to protect their logos or their mottos, but instead, they should let people, and different charitable organizations use them for the right cause. For instance, the logo of Product Red can be used by different companies in order to raise fuds; you can use that logo on a variety of different products, sell those products, and donate all the proceedings to the said charity. This could almost be called an open-source way of branding; and using one brand, you are providing a brand to everyone who wants to do something for the greater good.

Don’t Own The Customer

As a charity brand, you do not need to own your customer at all. For starters, Apple thinks of their customers as the iPhone owners, and Samsung thinks of their customers as Android owners. However, charity brands do not need to engage in such possessiveness at all. When it comes to charity brands – participation is more important than perception.

Let Go of The Brand Values

Sure, brand values are great when it comes to bringing a brand to life, however, this only suits the corporate brand. As for a charity brand, they can easily let go of the brand values. Simply put, a charity brand that is for children can allow the people to be from different walks of life like being idealistic, rebellious, and youthful; the participants do not need to follow a set of brand values that they have been given to them by the charity brand. This ends up being a lot more charming, as well as motivating for people who are working in the charity brand, as well as the ones who are witnessing it.

Categories: Other